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Wednesday, 27 January 2016
Revised 28 January

Hit-and-run driver injures motorcyclist and wrecks bike

Doubts arise over police accident report

Report: Paul Janik. Photographs: Paul Janik and Thames Valley Police
'X' is where a motorcyclist would wait before turning left into one-way Station Road.

Police are hunting a hit-and-run car driver that almost killed a motorcyclist and wrecked his motorbike.

It happened on Saturday evening, 23 January 2016, at 20:27 hours, in a side road on the north side of Burnham railway station.

The lucky to-be-alive, motorcyclist told police he was waiting at the junction of Sandringham Court cul-de-sac before entering Station Road when a car turning into Sandringham Court hit him. The car did not stop. It did a u-turn in Sandringham Court then sped-off into Station Road before going northwards along Burnham Lane.

The impact was so severe the 24 year-old Learner was flung-off his motorcycle fracturing both his wrists as he hit the road. His red Honda 124cc was wrecked.

The motorcyclist described the vehicle that hit him as a dark coloured car similar to an 'old style' Vauxhall Astra.

The motorcyclist's fractures were treated at Wexham Park Hospital's accident and emergency department. He is now off-work for several weeks.

The police's investigating officer, PC Wayne Reece based at the Roads Policing Unit in the former Taplow Drill Hall on the Bath Road, said:


This photograph of the motorcycle taken at the scene of the collision shows the significant damage inflicted by the collision. It is inconceivable that the other driver would not have known there had been a collision and it is also likely that the car would have suffered damage too.

The police's description does not accurately explain how this serious collision occurred. Twice the Slough Times put detailed technical concerns to the police, but they never responded.

  1. Looking at the police's photograph of the wrecked motorcycle, one notices the front wheel is bent to the right indicating the motorcycle was hit from the left side (nearside).
  2. Station Road, originally dual direction until the Slough's Labour clowns (Cllrs Swindle & Anderson) closed-down the railway tunnel next to Burnham station, is currently one-way, meaning north-bound traffic only.
  3. Motor vehicles, including cars and motorcycles, driving out of Sandringham Court have to turn left, northwards, because of the one-way direction of Station Road.
  4. If the motorcycle was correctly positioned for its compulsory left-turn, its position would be at the 'X' mark in the photograph.
  5. For a car to hit the left side of the motorcycle at position 'X' it must have driven the wrong way into Station Road, deliberately ignoring four large conspicuously 'No Entry' signs at the Burnham Lane junction with Station Road, then driven on the wrong side (right side) of Station Road. This means the car's right side (off-side) would have hit the stationary motorcycle, knocking him off his motorbike and then perhaps driven over the body of the motorcyclist laying in the road on the right side of his now damaged motorcycle.
  6. If the car had been travelling in the correct direction, northwards up the Station Road hill from the now closed railway tunnel, it becomes increasing difficult to understand how the car could have hit the left side of the front of the motorcycle, unless the motorcycle was not at position 'X' but somewhere else.

Further speculation must wait until the police end their puzzling silence.

However this serious accident occurred, the Slough Times is pleased the motorcyclist was not more seriously injured. The extent of the damage shows speed was a material factor.

Hit-and-run accidents seem to be increasing. A Slough Times reporter escaped serious injury when his motorcycle was pushed-over by a hit-and-run motorist on Christmas Eve.

If you notice a badly damaged car, then call the police on 101 to report the car's numberplate, make and model and its location. You never know when this information might be important in solving a crime.